14/05/2018
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

History Scotland Lectures II - Coastal history

80eaefd8-2603-49d2-a803-33ea139f1dfd

The second in the History Scotland Lectures series, in association with the University of Dundee Centre for Scottish Culture, is 'Coastal history in Scotland', on 30 August 2018, in Inverness.

Dr David Worthington of the University of the Highlands & Islands will present an in-depth exploration of the role Scotland's coastline has played in our history.

Free entry. Reserve your place by e-mail or on tel: 0113 2002922.

Venue: Highland Archive and Registration Centre, Bught Road, Inverness IV3 5SS. Time: 6.30pm.

About the History Scotland lectures

History Scotland's newest project is a lecture series which will travel around Scotland, giving people around the country the chance to learn more about Scotland’s history.

Since its inception all the way back in 2001, History Scotland’s mission has remained the same: to bring its readers cutting-edge historical research in an accessible, engaging format and to promote the study of Scotland’s rich and fascinating past.

We have sought to attain these goals in multiple ways, through the magazine, of course, but also via our website, our social media presence, our podcasts, our digital special guides, our writing prizes and, most recently, our standalone ‘Essays’ series. Now, however, we are delighted to reveal our biggest, most ambitious and most exciting venture yet – The History Scotland Lectures.

Developed in association with the University of Dundee Centre for Scottish Culture, The History Scotland Lectures is an ongoing series that consists of two public talks each year, free of charge and open to all, offering insights from leading experts into the latest research on a huge range of topics.

Watch a video of the first lecture: 'Who were the Jacobites and what did they want for Scotland?' a debate between Professor Murray Pittock (University of Glasgow) and Professor Christopher Whatley (University of Dundee).

Back to "Events & Exhibitions" Category

14/05/2018 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

Malcolm IV was crowned king of Scotland - In this day on history

Malcolm IV was crowned king of Scotland on 27 May 1153.


The siege of Dunnottar Castle ended - On this day in history

The siege of Dunnottar Castle ended on 26 May 1652, when the Royalist stronghold surrendered. ...


David I of Scotland died - On this day in history

David I of Scotland died on 24 May 1153 at Carlisle.


Roman troops and legions on Scotland’s Antonine Wall

John Richardson, founder of the Antonine Guard living history society, explores the various Roman legions and ...


Other Articles

'She didn't really exist' - expert debunks myth behind Fair Maid's House in Perth

One of the most persistent myths about the history of Perth has been debunked by historian Dr Nicola ...


Scottish pirate William Kidd was executed - On this day in history

Scottish pirate William Kidd was executed on 23 May 1701 in London. ...


Outlander map from VisitScotland updated with new season 3 locations around Scotland

New filming locations in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Ayrshire have been added to VisitScotland's Outlander tourist ...


The Quintinshill Rail disaster occurred - On this day in history

The Quintinshill Rail disaster, one of the worst train disasters in UK history, occurred on 22 May 1915.