22/02/2018
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Lost at Sea - new exhibition explores the dangers of life at sea over the years

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A new exhibition which takes a look at the dangers of life at sea, as well as the people and inventions which have helped to keep us safe over the years opens at the Scottish Maritime Museum on 2 March 2018.

Lost on the Tide features a Lloyd's Medal for Saving Life at Sea, awarded to Ardrossan man Peter Sharp and recently gifted to the Museum by his family. Captain Sharp, who was master of the sailing brig Annabella Clark, an Ardrossan-built and registered cargo ship (Barclay & Shearer, Ardrossan), received the medal alongside shipmate John McIntosh.

The pair were recognised for their actions saving the lives of the crew of French ship 'Melanie' when 600 barrels of petroleum she was carrying exploded on the River Adour in southwest France on 20th November 1878.

Roaring waves and howling winds

Chris Walker, Exhibitions and Events Officer at the Scottish Maritime Museum, describes the inspiration behind the new exhibition: “Roaring waves, howling winds, driving rain; the seas around Scotland’s coasts can be a dangerous place. For as long as we’ve travelled along Scotland’s 6,000 miles of coastline and ninety inhabited islands, people have striven to make sure that they and their precious cargo arrive safely at their destination. 

“From the fishing fleets of the East coast, through the industrial heartlands of the Clyde and on into the thriving seas around the Western Islands, generations of Scots have looked outwards to the ocean for their livelihoods and prosperity. Lost on the Tide looks at how our seas shape our lives and culture, at the dangers faced by sailors around our coasts, and at some of the lifesaving equipment, ingenious inventions and brave men and women who risk their lives to make us safer at sea.”

Lost at Sea runs from 2 March to 13 May at the Scottish Maritime Museum, Linthouse Building, Harbour Road, Irvine KA12 8BT; tel: 01294 278283; email; website.

(Images copyright Scottish Maritime Museum)

Lost on the Tide Image 1 S.T. Cruiser, Steel & Bennie, Ashore on North Shore, Ardrossan, Gale 08.01.1958

Lost on the Tide Image 2 S.S. Ballyhalbert, Kellys of Belfast, Ashore on North Shore, Ardrossan, Gale 08.01.1958

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