21/04/2016
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Illustrator recreates East Lomond Pictish hillfort

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Renowned illustrator Bob Marshall has created an interpretation of a Pictish hillfort based on archaeological research by the Discover the Ancient Lomonds project team. For all the latest archaeology news, dig reports and finds analysis, read History Scotland magazine.

In 2014, the Living Lomonds Big Dig excavated an area to the south of the summit of East Lomond. Now the evidence uncovered has become part of an illustration showing how the Pictish Hillfort might have looked. East Lomond Hill is crowned by a fort of at least two phases and the fort is believed to have spanned the Bronze Age period through to the Iron Age and into the Early Medieval Period.

The illustrations

Illustrator Bob Marshall has incorporated the finds of the Big Dig 2014 to include metalworking uncovered by Living Lomonds volunteer archaeologists, in order to show how the East Lomond Pictish hillfort might have looked (above). Other examples of Bob's work will form part of the digital and interpretative elements of the project which will be revealed in the coming months. Bob's illustration of Lochore Castle is shown below.

Discover the Ancient Lomonds project

The Living Lomonds Discover the Ancient Lomonds project aims to capture the history of human relationships with the landscape of the Living Lomonds area from the end of the Ice Age (10,000BC) through to the twentieth century.

The Lomond and Benarty Hills area is rich in archaeology, including remains of sites and finds from 10,000 years of human activity.

Activities include archaeological digs, talks, themed archaeology events, walks and activities.

 

To find out more, visit the website. For more information on Bob Marshall's work, visit his website.

 

 

 

(Illustrations copyright Bob Marshall; photo copyright Lon McGregor)

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