12/12/2017
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Local Landscape Heroes heritage trail opens at Roman Bathhouse, Strathclyde Country Park

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North Lanarkshire Provost, Jean Jones, has opened a new Local Landscape Heroes heritage trail which explores some of the most significant historical features in the region.

Jean Jones was joined by representatives of project partners and funders, as well as local councillors and members of community groups, at the launch. The trail was created by CAVLP Heritage, managed by Northlight Heritage, working in partnership with Phoenix Futures, as part of the Heritage Lottery Fund and LEADER supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership (CAVLP).

Local landscape heroes

The trail forms part of the CAVLP Heritage Project, Local Landscape Heroes, which celebrates the people and communities that have shaped and been inspired by the landscape of the Clyde and Avon Valley over the millennia. The trail takes walkers past some of the most significant historical features in North Lanarkshire, including:

  • The Roman Baths at Strathclyde Park
  • Clyde Bridge
  • Dalzell Estate
  • St Patricks Kirkyard

CAVLP Heritage Officer Dr Paul Murtagh says, “The hard work of the service users has been really inspiring, and often goes unnoticed. I think we can safely say that they are contemporary Local Landcape Hereos. The idea with the trail is that we will be following in the footsteps of historical people and communities that shaped or were inspired by the landscape of the Clyde and Avon Valley, like the Roman soliders whose Bathhouse we’ve helped preserve and whose roads we still walk down, to the miners from Bothwell Haugh as well as wealthyland owners like Lady Hamilton who designed the beautiful landscape around Dalzell Estate that we enjoy today.”

“But we also wanted to celebrate people who are contemporary Local Landscape Heroes whose work often goes unrecognised, such as the group of local RSPB members who helped form Baron’s Haugh in the early 1980s, as well as the work of Phoenix Futures who have been helping to enhance and preserve important natural and historical sites so that people and communities can continue to enjoy the beautiful, historical, landscapes today."

Explore the trail online.

(images copyright CAVLP)

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