03/08/2017
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Winners announced in search for Scotland's Hidden Gems

f1b20c24-9d9a-4a23-9817-216ad67e7db5

Six Scottish sites have been chosen by public vote in Dig it! 2017's search for the Hidden Gems of Scotland, which attracted more than 12,000 votes.

The winning sites include Viking era monuments, a 'castle on the hill' and a medieval burial ground. The ‘Scotland in Six – Hidden Gems’ campaign began in June after 28 sites were nominated by local groups and organisations. Voting took place on Facebook, where one “like” equalled one vote.

The six winning Hidden Gems sites are now preparing to mark their victory with six events during Scottish Archaeology Month in September.

The results are as follows:

  • Govan Stones, Glasgow
  • Ardrossan Castle, North Ayrshire
  • The Howff, Dundee
  • James Watt Cottage, Bo’ness (Falkirk)
  • Campbeltown Picture House, Argyll & Bute
  • Lincluden Collegiate Church, Dumfries & Galloway

With over 2,000 votes, the Govan Stones was the most popular site. The collection consists of 31 medieval stones carved in the Viking era, including carved crosses and five Viking hogback stones. Ardrossan Castle, a medieval ruin which once played host to some of Scotland’s most powerful people including William Wallace, came in second place.

Hidden gems

The Howff, a 453-year-old graveyard, landed in third place with over 1,000 votes. Fourth place was claimed by James Watt Cottage - the former workshop of the inventor James Watt, whose steam engine played a key role in the Industrial Revolution.

Campbeltown Picture House, one of the earliest surviving purpose-built cinemas in the UK, came in fifth place with over 800 votes. The final spot was claimed by Lincluden Collegiate Church, where visitors can still find angels and cherubs carved in the stone.

Dr Jeff Sanders, Dig It! 2017 Project Manager, said: “We’ve been thrilled by the reaction to the Hidden Gems campaign. The people who nominated the sites have put an enormous amount of time and effort into the promotion and it’s been great to see members of the public respond with equal enthusiasm - whether they’re sharing childhood memories or discovering a site for the first time.”

Back to "News" Category

03/08/2017 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

The Burrell Collection was opened - On this day in Scottish history

The Burrell Collection was opened on 21 October 1983.


Colin Campbell 1st Baron of Clyde was born - On this day in Scottish history

Colin Campbell, 1st Baron Clyde was born on 20 October 1792.


The first public sedan chairs in Scotland became available - On this day in Scottish history

Scotland's first public hire sedan chairs became available on 19 October 1687.


Queen consort Margaret Tudor died on 18 October 1541

Queen consort Margaret Tudor died on 18 October 1541.


Other Articles

The best Scottish castles to visit – History Scotland’s ultimate castles guide

Which are the best Scottish castles to explore? Which castles in Scotland are open during the winter? Plan ...


History events in Scotland - November 2018

Discover things to do in Scotland in November with our round-up of history-inspired events. ...


Craigmillar Castle to stage Mary Queen of Scots light projection event - 1 to 4 November 2018

Experience Craigmillar Castle in a different light with a new after-dark event ‘Spotlight on Mary Queen of ...


The Skye Bridge opened - on this day in Scottish history

The Skye Bridge opened on 16 October 1995.