11/11/2017
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On this day in history - The Armistice was signed, marking the end of World War I

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On 11 November 1918, representatives of the Allied forces and Germany signed the Armistice, marking the end of World War One. For more on Scotland in World War One, browse our special website section.

The armistice was signed in a railway carriage in Compiegne Forest in France, and marked the end of hostilities which began in 1914.

The end of the war was met with celebrations around the world, as shown in this newsreel.



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