16/07/2014
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The lost tomb of Robert the Bruce revealed

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The gilded white marble tomb in which Robert the Bruce was buried has been pieced together by heritage experts.

A special new exhibition at The Hunterian in Glasgow will allow visitors to see the first complete 3D model of the tomb, which was lost during the Reformation era.

Robert the Bruce, who was King of Scots from 1306 to 1329, was buried at Dunfermline Abbey and his grave marked by an elaborate white marble tomb which was specially imported from Paris. Centuries after the tomb was lost, a grave and fragments of gilded stone, believed to have been part of the tomb, were found in 1818 and later given to The Hunterian and National Museums of Scotland. A further fragment was recently found at Abbotsford House.

A 3D re-creation

In order to mark the 700th anniversary of the battle of Bannockburn, a consortium of heritage bodies, including The Hunterian, have been working together to create a digital visualisation of the tomb and its historic setting. The visualisation was created by the Digital Design Studio at the Glasgow School of Art.

Visitors to the Lost Tomb exhibition can see a 3.5 minute animated film which shows the position of the remaining fragments, as well as a look at the reconstructed tomb.

The Lost Tomb of Robert the Bruce exhibition

The Lost Tomb of Robert the Bruce is at The Hunterian from 24 June 2014 to 4 January 2015 and entry is free.

Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Gilbert Scott Building, Glasgow G12 8QQ; tel: 0141 330 4221; website.

The Lost Tomb of Robert the Bruce is a collaboration between The Royal Commission for Ancient and Historic Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS), Historic Scotland, The Hunterian (University of Glasgow), the National Museums of Scotland, Fife Cultural Trust, the Abbotsford Trust, the National Records of Scotland, the Digital Design Studio (Glasgow School of Art) and received research grant funding from the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

(Bruce tomb images © Digital Design Studio)

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