16/04/2018
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New Slains Castle awarded Listed status by Historic Environment Scotland

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New Slains Castle, Aberdeenshire, the ruin which may have inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula has been granted Listed status in recognition of its special historic interest.

The cliff-top ruin, which is east of Cruden Bay in Aberdeenshire, on Scotland's east coast, was built in the 16th by Francis Hay, to replace an older castle which stood on the same site. A new entrance and frontage were added in 1707, with the building being remodelled in 1836 by Aberdeen architect John Smith, who adopted a Tudor style for the building. The castle fell into disrepair in the early 20th century, and its roof was removed to exempt it from taxes.

New Slains Castle listing

The listing by Historic Environment Scotland recognises the building as a site of special historic interest. The organisation's head of designations Elizabeth McCrone said: “New Slains Castle is a fantastic addition to Scotland’s diverse range of listed buildings. This impressive ruin has four centuries of history to tell us about, not only for its architecture but for its literary associations.

"Dr Samuel Johnson and his biographer James Boswell visited New Slains Castle in 1773 and both were moved to write about it in their subsequent famous journals about their tour of Scotland. In the 19th century the author Bram Stoker stayed in the area and the Castle is said to have helped to inspire his most famous novel, Dracula

“Today, it continues to dominate the landscape and command views over the North Sea – making it a unique landmark in the area. Listing will help to ensure that its interest is recognised for future generations.”

(image of New Slains Castle copyright Andrew Leatherbarrow)

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