19/06/2017
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Outlander series film locations map highlights Scottish history and heritage attractions

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As UK-wide screening of the Outlander series gets underway, we take a look at historic attractions featured on VisitScotland's Outlander series 1 and 2 film locations map.

The time-travel TV series Outlander, inspired by Diana Gabaldon's novels, has gathered millions of fans around the world, including the US, Canada, Europe and beyond. Now, More4 has confirmed that it will screen the series to UK audiences over the coming months.

Inspired by VisitScotland's Outlander film locations map, we take a look at ten of the sites featured, exploring how each place is featured in the Outlander series.

Download the map.

1. Glencoe, Argyll

The valley of Glencoe features in the opening credits of Outlander and, for many people, sums up the beautiful and rugged landscape of the Scottish Highlands. Many who drive along the pretty Glencoe Pass are unaware that the valley has a dark history, as the scene of the Glencoe Massacre of 13 February 1692, when 38 members of the Macdonald clan were killed by Royalist forces.

2. Linlithgow Palace, West Lothian

Fifteenth-century Linlithgow Palace features in Outlander when its entrance and corridors are used as Wentworth Prison, where Jamie is imprisoned. The palace was a favoured residence of the Stewart monarchs, being a convenient stopping off point between Edinburgh and Stirling, where the main royal palaces were located.

Linlithgow is the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots and the building is famed for its ornate fountain, which can be seen in operation on Sundays in July and August.

3. George Square, Glasgow

Glasgow's George Square was the scene of Frank's proposal to Claire, with this historic city space being transformed into a 1940s street scene. Todays visitors can see explore the varied architecture of this landmark square, which is named after King George III and laid down in 1781. There are many statues of figures from Scottish history, including Robert Burns, James Watt and Sir Walter Scott; and the city's World War I cenotaph is also in the square.

4. Glasgow Cathedral, Glasgow

Staying in Glasgow, the city's medieval cathedral becomes L'Hopital des Anges, where Claire becomes a volunteer. The twelfth-century building houses the tomb of St Mungo, Glasgow's patron saint, and is also home to some of the UK's finest postwar stained glass windows.

5. Culross, Fife

The village of Culross in Fife is a pretty coastal settlement which was once a thriving port. In Outlander, the village's Mercat Cross is transformed into the town of Cranesmuir, the home of Geillis Duncan. Culross also provides the setting for Claire's herbal garden and features as a Jacobite encampment.

6. Callendar House, Falkirk

14th-century Callendar House in Falkirk appears in season 2 as part of the Duke of Sandringham's Bellhurst Manor, with the Houses's Georgian kitchen used during filming. The mansion, which belongs to Falkirk Community Trust, regularly hosts living history displays by costumed interpreters, and also has exhibitions on the history of Callendar House and the surrounding area.

7. Highland Folk Museum, Highlands

This living history museum in Newtonmore, which showcases the domestic and working conditions of Highlanders over the centuries, appears in several Outlander scenes, with the museum's replica turf-roofed crofts providing an authentic view of life in bygone Scotland. Visitors can explore the reconstruction buildings, which include an 18th-century township and a working croft.

8. Preston Mill, East Lothian

Preston Mill in East Linton, East Lothian, provides the backdrop to Outlander's dramatic Jacobite rising scenes. Preston Mill is one of the UK's oldest water-driven meal mills still in operation, and guided tours demonstrate the gruelling life of the miller, with the heavy work involved in using and maintaining the mill machinery.

9. Bo'ness & Kinneil Railway, Central Lowlands

Scotland's largest railway museum formed the backdrop to the famous scene from series one, where Claire and Frank say their goodbyes at a wartime railway station. Both steam-hauled and diesel trains operate from this heritage railway, whilst the museum is home to a wide range of railway artefacts, from station signposts to full-size locomotives.

10. Doune Castle, Stirling

Medieval Doune Castle plays a dual role in series 1 - when it appears as the fictional Castle Leoch, home to Colum Mackenzie; and also the real-life Doune Castle that Claire and Frank visit on a day trip. The castle was built for Regent Albany and hosted his guests in near-royal splendour, with lavish banquets and rich decorations. 

Watch Outlander author Diana Gabaldon talk about her first ever visit to Scotland:

(images: Highland Folk Museum copyright Paul Hermans; Preston Mill copyright Marsupium Photography; Culross copyright Paul Taylor; video copyright VisitScotland)

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