Eighteenth century cottage to be rebuilt stone by stone using original building methods


18 January 2012
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imports_CESC_0-rgirj8y2-100000_11974.jpg Eighteenth century cottage to be rebuilt stone by stone using original building methods
The eighteenth-century home of botanist John Hope is to be rebuilt with its original stones and timbers in an £80,000 project. ...
The eighteenth-century home of botanist John Hope is to be rebuilt with its original stones and timbers in an £80,000 project.

A historic cottage at Haddington Place, Edinburgh which was once the home of botanist Professor John Hope is to be rebuilt in a project costing £80,000. Hope was the first regius keeper of Edinburgh's Botanic Gardens and the cottage where he lived whilst keeper was designed by John Adam. It was dismantled in 2008, when the road on which is stands was threatened with demolition and all of its stones and timbers were numbered and stored. Subsequent research into the history of the cottage has revealed detailed records of its construction and those involved, which will be of value when the cottage is rebuilt.

James Simpson of architects Simpson & Brown said: We realised this little building, while architecturally modest, had far greater significance than we had thought. Because we have so much detailed information about the cottage, we can test how building projects were carried out at the time of the construction of the first New Town. We will not use modern materials, and will try to build the way they did in the 18th century.'

The rebuilt cottage will house a lecture and meeting room and will stand within a teaching garden for children and community groups. For more on the project, visit the Botanic Cottage project website.

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