William Wallace Facts - William Wallace's forgotten commander Andrew Murray


05 October 2011
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Generations of Scots have been brought up on tales of the bravery of William Wallace, but many would be astonished to hear that Wallace fought the Battle of Stirling Bridge alongside another commander, Andrew Murray. Claire Casey tells the story of the man who history forgot. ...

Generations of Scots have been brought up on tales of the bravery of William Wallace, but many would be astonished to hear that Wallace fought the Battle of Stirling Bridge alongside another commander, Andrew Murray. Claire Casey tells the story of the man whom history forgot.

On 11 September, 1297, not far from the town of Stirling, a battle took place that would echo down the centuries as one of the most iconic victories in Scottish history. For many people in Scotland and further afield, the confrontation that would become known as the Battle of Stirling Bridge was the victory of Sir William Wallace. But this ignores the fact that Wallace was not in sole command of the Scottish army during the battle.


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Wallace actually shared the command of the Scottish army that day with a fellow young patriot. Andrew Murray was a nobleman from the area around the Moray Firth. He had once been a prisoner of the English after the Scottish army was defeated at the Battle of Dunbar. Somehow, Murray managed to escape and made his way back to Scotland by early 1297. Once back on his home ground, it didn't take him long to stir the Highlands into rebelling against the English. How and where Wallace and Murray met and why they decided to join forces is still a mystery. But despite this, the result of this partnership has gone down in Scottish history.