Robert the Bruce charter inspires Haddington 700 celebrations


16 October 2017
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Revised-logo-300x262-38125.jpg Haddington 700 celebrations around the Robert the Bruce charter of 1318
A charter granted by Robert the Bruce to the Scottish town of Haddington in 1318 is the inspiration behind a year of celebrations planned for 2018, the 700th anniversary of the granting of the royal charter.

A charter granted by Robert the Bruce to the Scottish town of Haddington in 1318 is the inspiration behind a year of celebrations planned for 2018, the 700th anniversary of the granting of the royal charter.

The 1318 charter is the oldest document cared for by East Lothian Archives and at the time it was granted, the town of Haddington had already been a burgh for 200 years. An older charter granted by King David I had been lost, and so the Bruce charter reconfirmed Haddington's right to hold a market and collect customs.

The charter, which with its accompanying seal has been conserved by National Records of Scotland, is written in Latin on vellum. It was kept by National Records of Scotland until 2012, when the John Gray Centre opened.

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Haddington 700 celebrations

The Haddington 700 celebrations are being coordinated by the John Gray Centre and will include exhibitions, school storytelling sessions and archaeological geophysical surveys, as well as events planned by more than 35 community groups – including a film festival, concerts and art exhibitions.

(logo copyright Haddington 700)