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Neil Oliver announced as ambassador in Scotland for Combat Stress charity

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TV presenter, author and archaeologist Neil Oliver has been appointed the Scottish ambassador for the veterans' mental health charity Combat Stress.

Dr Oliver will help the charity to raise awareness of its work supporting former servicemen and women with issues including trauma, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Neil recently visited Hollybush House, the Combat Stress treatment centre in Ayr, to meet with veterans supported by the charity, where he said: “Through my work and the research projects I have been involved in, I am aware of the psychological impact war can have. Regardless of age, gender and conflict, the trauma of war can have a devastating and debilitating effect on service personnel and veterans.
 
“I greatly admire the armed forces. Through my role as ambassador of Combat Stress, I will use my profile to raise awareness of why the charity is needed and the invaluable work it does not only in Scotland but throughout the UK.”
 
Wartime connections
 
The Daily Record reported that Neil had spoken to visitors at the Hollybush House event, where he chatted about his connections to the World Wars: “I’m just a TV presenter with long hair so I’m humbled when I come here and speak to people who have been through so much.

“I’ve never served in the forces but both my grandfathers did. My dad’s dad was at the Somme and my mum’s dad fought at Gallipoli, so military history and veterans have always fascinated me.”

New ambassador

Sue Freeth, Chief Executive of Combat Stress said: “By raising awareness of Combat Stress we are able to reach more veterans struggling with their mental health, and provide them with the support they need and deserve. It also enables us to raise more money to provide our specialist clinical treatment that helps former servicemen and women rebuild their lives.
 
“We are delighted that Neil has become an ambassador for Combat Stress in Scotland. With his support we can continue to highlight the issue of veterans’ mental health and increase understanding of the reality of living with service-related trauma.”
 
To find out more about the work of Combat Stress, visit their website.
 

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