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New Web Continuity Service will preserve key websites for future generations

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National Records of Scotland (NRS) has announced the launch of its new Web Continuity Service, a new web archive which will preserve key official websites and make them available for future generations.

The new service aims to preserve key information on official websites, making that information available in the future, even if the website should change or go offline. The service will archive and make available ‘snapshots’ of the websites of organisations who already deposit records with NRS :

  • the Scottish Government
  • Scottish Courts
  • public inquiries in Scotland
  • public authorities
  • some private organisations

Authenticity in an era of 'fake news'

Tim Ellis, the Chief Executive of NRS and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said: “In an era of ‘fake news’ where the authenticity of information is scrutinised and challenged, the Web Continuity Service will allow users to access accurate historical information, and make it clear when they are reading archived content.

“This new service allows us to preserve information for the future and keep it available now to the people who need it, supporting open and transparent government.”

The service is operated by National Records of Scotland working with a commercial supplier, Internet Memory Research with a strong track record in this area. It will capture information in the public domain, regularly “crawling” websites after agreement with their owners to ensure the correct handling of any sensitive information, and intellectual property rights.

Access the NRS Web Archive.

Read an exclusive National Records of Scotland column in every issue of History Scotland magazine.

(Image by Niels Elgaard Larsen - Own work photo, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15306011)

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