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The village of Restalrig has been named Edinburgh's 50th conservation area

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The village of Restalrig, which has medieval origins and contains several listed buildings, has been named as Edinburgh's fiftieth conservation area. Conservation area status means that the village is recognised as an area of architectural and historic interest and will be subject to extra rules to control building work.

The village of Restalrig developed around the ancient parish church of St Margaret (formerly Restalrig Parish Church). The name Restalrig is a 15th century variant on the name Lestalric, recorded from the late 12th century. The area was part of a medieval estate owned by the De Lestalrics.

Approval for the conservation area status was given after a report was considered by the Planning Committee, following a public consultation in the local area.

The village of Restalrig

Restalrig lies to the north east of the city and the boundary of the conservation area includes St Margaret’s Parish Church, graveyard and surrounding buildings at the entrance to Restalrig Road South from Restalrig Avenue.

Restalrig conservation area is historically significant as a result of its development around St Margaret’s Parish Church. Within the area there are other listed buildings at 62 Restalrig Road South and The Deanery Wall. There is also a scheduled monument, St Triduana’s Aisle, Chapel and Well house. These buildings reflect the historical and architectural significance of the area and its development as a centre of religious activities. 

Conservation area protection

Councillor Neil Gardiner, Planning Convener, said: “I would like to thank all those who showed an interest in Restalrig and filled out our survey. The results helped us make today’s decision as the comments were almost unanimous in expressing support for the area being given conservation status. 

“Conservation areas have special architectural or historic interest and we protect them by putting in place extra rules to control building work. The use of natural materials in several of the listed buildings in the area, such as rubble stone, creates a sense of place and are integral to its character.”

(image copyright Edinburgh City Council)

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