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University of Edinburgh's Old Medical School Courtyard to be re-named in honour of Dr Elsie Inglis

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A medical pioneer who saved countless soldiers’ lives has been honoured by her former university 100 years after her death.

The University of Edinburgh’s Old Medical School courtyard is to be renamed in memory of the trailblazing doctor Elsie Inglis, who was one of Edinburgh’s first women graduates.

The announcement was made by the University’s Chancellor, Her Royal Highness the Princess Royal, during a visit to Edinburgh today (Wednesday 29 November). A plaque highlighting the square’s revised name – the Dr Elsie Inglis Quadrangle – has been unveiled. 

The heroism of Dr Inglis

Dr Elsie Inglis is credited with saving thousands of lives after founding 17 Scottish Women's Hospitals across Europe during the First World War. She also established a medical college for women and a maternity hospital for poor mothers in Edinburgh.

The Edinburgh-raised doctor and suffragette died in November 1917 after returning to Britain from Russia where she had been treating wounded Serbian and Russian soldiers. 

After her death, Sir Winston Churchill was quoted as saying that Dr Inglis and her medical staff “will shine in history”.

A remarkable achievement

University of Edinburgh Principal, Professor Sir Timothy O’Shea, has welcomed the news: “I am very pleased to be marking the centenary of the death of one of our most inspirational alumni. Naming our historic quadrangle after Dr Inglis is a fitting reminder of her remarkable achievements and lasting legacy.”

(image copyright The Wellcome Collection)

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