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Winners announced for the Scottish Heritage Angel Awards 2017

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The winners of the 2017 Scottish Heritage Angel Awards have been announced at a special ceremony at the Assembly Rooms in Edinburgh.

The ceremony saw winning finalists in each of the four award categories crowned in a celebration of the groups, individuals, volunteers and professionals who have played a special part in caring for the nation’s historic environment.

Launched in 2014 with funding from the Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation (ALWF), and run by the Scottish Civic Trust in partnership with Historic Environment Scotland (HES), Archaeology Scotland and the Scottish Government, the Scottish Heritage Angel Awards celebrates both groups and individuals who have gone above and beyond in their efforts to promote, protect and, in many cases, rescue Scotland’s heritage.

Winner - Best rescue of a historic building

Scooping the award for Best Rescue of a Historic Building was Pat Cassidy of Govan Workspace and a group of volunteers who led the project to restore the shipbuilding offices of the former Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company in Govan, Glasgow. The historic site now hosts a community-based museum on shipbuilding, as well as commercial offices.

Winner - Best contribution to a heritage project by a young person

The Apprentice Guides at the National Mining Museum topped the Best Contribution to a Heritage Project by a Young Person category. The seven pupils from Gore Glen Primary School in Gorebridge worked with museum staff to create their own tour of the site for other schools.

Winner - Best Craftsmanship or Apprentice on a Heritage Rescue or Repair Project

The Best Craftsmanship or Apprentice on a Heritage Rescue or Repair Project was won by Leslie Merriman, now Assistant Works Manager with HES, for his work with the Orkney Monument Conservation Unit. Leslie served his stonemasonry apprenticeship after joining HES and now mentors new apprentices.

Winner - Best Rescue, Recording or Interpretation of a Historic Place

The Whithorn Trust were recognised for their project to build a full-scale reconstruction of an Iron Age roundhouse in Dumfries with the Best Rescue, Recording or Interpretation of a Historic Place award.

Creating a legacy

John Pelan, Director of the Scottish Civic Trust, said: “The Scottish Heritage Angel Awards have been a joy to deliver.  The judges had an extremely difficult job to choose four winners from each of the categories, and all the shortlisted groups and individuals deserve huge praise for their achievements in rescuing, recording and celebrating Scotland’s historic buildings and places. 

“In the end, those nominees who demonstrated the best evidence of sharing of skills, overcoming adversity and creating a legacy made it to the top.  Congratulations to all the nominees, and particularly to our four winners.”

Find out more about the Scottish Heritage Angel Awards on their website.

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