‘Houndis’, ‘halkis’ and ‘uther his hienes pettis’: Animals in the Court of James VI, c.1579-1603: 20 September


15 March 2023
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Nicole Maceira Cumming explores the role of animals within the court of James VI and considers what the royal animals can tell us about the relationship between human and animal in early modern Scotland

20 September 2023, 6.30pm UK time

PLACES ARE LIMITED SO BOOK NOW FOR JUST £10

James VI’s love of hunting is often highlighted by historians and yet the hunting animals that lived and worked within the royal court are rarely mentioned. The hunting establishment did not only consist of human servants, but of numerous hounds, horses and hawks that made the hunt possible. Similarly, other animals that were a frequent feature of the Scottish royal court have been given little attention.

A royal menagerie

The royal menagerie contained a variety of animals, from lions to gamecocks.

  • Who cared for these animals?
  • What were their roles?
  • And how can we build a picture of their lives from (largely) economic account books?

This 45 minute talk will reflect on these questions, examining the role of animals within the court of James VI and considering what the royal animals can tell us about the relationship between human and animal in early modern Scotland.

Event details

Join Nicole Maceira Cumming for a live c.45-minute illustrated online talk on 20 September at 6.30pm UK time, followed by approximately 30 minutes of questions from the audience. The registration fee includes on-demand access to the event recording (released the following day) for 7 days after the broadcast.

The event will be chaired by Dr Allan Kennedy, Lecturer in History at the University of Dundee and consultant editor of History Scotland magazine.

Registration fee: £10 - includes 7-day access to the event recording. Starts 6.30pm UK time. To find the start time in your time zone, visit TimeAndDate. Got a question about booking? E-mail Rachel Bellerby. 


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Speaker details

Nicole Maceira Cumming is an AHRC-funded PhD candidate at the Universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow, and a committee member of the Northern Early Modern Network. Her current research examines the impact of the Reformation on human and animal relationships in early modern Scotland.  

 

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Image: The Hunting Park tapestery, courtesy Metropolitan Museum, public domain